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Is there a comprehensive "base" locale file we can localise on?

I downloaded UK English (which only covers the nuances between UK and US English), but is there a complete file which allows us to add the locale information we need?

It may be an odd request, but I bought over a Scottish football forum (onlyanexcuse.com) and i'm trying to offer users the option of Scots - not entirely necessary, but i'm learning the new forum platform with it. With the referendum polls opening today, these little things are a nice compliment to add. Everyone's curious about Scotland all of a sudden. So far i've managed to convert the basics into Scots.

Scots does look like a 'slang' version of English (and it is in my view) but it is a recognised language here (for some reason more people claim to speak it here than Gaelic yet all train stops have that, which is bewildering - you can fill any of Glasgow's football stadia with the entire population of Gaelic speakers!), but for such a forum I feel it is a nice touch to add. I have a friend who is fluent in Scottish & Irish Gaelic and i've asked him to help me make a couple more locales too - i'm learning Gaelic as we speak! But in the meantime I thought Scots would be a good way to familiarise myself with how this part of Vanilla works. If it isn't seen as required in your locales area that would be entirely understandable, however i'm doing this for local and educational value more than anything; and if our users like it they have that option. So:

Which of all the current locales are the most comprehensive to easily type in new definitions?

Secondly do users have control over locales? If not, can they have?

Comments

  • whu606whu606 I'm not a SuperHero; I just like wearing tights... Moderator

    For a base locale, I guess you'd start here: http://vanillaforums.org/addon/baseline-locale

    Scots does look like a 'slang' version of English (and it is in my view)

    Not looking for a row, but that would be the view of someone who has no knowledge of linguistics. Scots is a separate language, similar to English firstly since they share Germanic/Scandinavian roots and then from regular contact with standard English.

    TBMYB
  • Not looking for a row, but that would be the view of someone who has no knowledge of linguistics. Scots is a separate language, similar to English firstly since they share Germanic/Scandinavian roots and then from regular contact with standard English.

    It is a dialect of early English.

    "Standard English" didn’t exist until recently.

    Consider that Shakespeare is considered "Modern English". That is how far we have come.

    grep is your friend.

  • Geordie also has old English roots.

    grep is your friend.

  • whu606whu606 I'm not a SuperHero; I just like wearing tights... Moderator
    edited September 2014

    x00

    Sorry, but it isn't, or not totally.

    Up to around 500AD the main languages of Great Britain were Celtic.

    Following Germanic invasions, the Celtic speakers were reduced to what we now call Cornwall, Wales and Scotland.

    Most of what is modern England was settled by Saxons (mainly south and west) and Angles (mainly east and north).

    The Northumbrian Germanic dialect was spoken in parts of Scotland.

    Subsequent Scandinavian invasions meant that Scots diverged from Northumbrian.

    Any 'Old' English dialect is, in fact Germanic (with bits of Scandinavian).

    Modern English is a result of the fusion of Germanic 'old' English (Anglo-Saxon itself divided into distinct language groups) and French, following the Norman conquest.

    Modern English has had a subsequent influence on Scots, especially since the Act of Union.

  • Scots basically split with Old English between the 9th and 15th century.

    Both Celtic and English are Germanic derived cultures.

    Old English is Old English so what if it is Germanic?

    grep is your friend.

  • whu606whu606 I'm not a SuperHero; I just like wearing tights... Moderator

    x00

    As I'm sure you know, there was no single 'Old English', but rather a variety of Germanic/Scandinavian languages spoken in what is now modern England (and lower Scotland.)

    Northumbrian 'old' English bears no relation to modern English.

    The original suggestion, that Scots is a version of (modern) English is simply false.

    Not sure what you mean by Celtic being a Germanic derived culture; they were different ethnic and tribal groups.

  • Celtic culture come from central Europe, where Germany is now.

    Although study of genetic shows there is no special link across Celtic groups, It was a cultural meme predominantly.

    The English have just as much in common with Scots than then Central European celt, if not more.

    grep is your friend.

  • Northumbrian English influenced modern English, as did many other dialects.

    grep is your friend.

  • x00x00 MVP
    edited September 2014

    Pictish influenced Gaelic but less so that Northumbrian English did Scots.

    That is becuase Gaels were already established, where as Scots is derived from Northumbrian English

    Edit sorry for the red herring, please continue.

    grep is your friend.

  • hgtonighthgtonight ∞ · New Moderator

    I learned a lot about languages just now.

    The MultiLingual addon supports locale preferences per user: http://vanillaforums.org/addon/multilingual-plugin

    Search first

    Check out the Documentation! We are always looking for new content and pull requests.

    Click on insightful, awesome, and funny reactions to thank community volunteers for their valuable posts.

    whu606TBMYB
  • Excellent guys, thank you. I will get started on these. Also learned much about languages here!

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